New novel food rules will “pave the way” for wider insect use

636507410504206279insectsplate (2).jpg

05 Jan 2018 --- As the new EU novel food rules start kicking in (from January 1, 2018), European insect producers have welcomed the move claiming that it should pave the way for the wider use of insects as food.

And an influx of applications concerning the use of insects in food could be seen this year as the new rules take effect, according to IPIFF, the European umbrella organization representing the interests of the Insect Production sector for Food and Feed.

The new regulations on novel foods, defined as anything without a significant history of consumption in the European Union before May 15, 1997, came into force on January 1, 2018, signaling the start of a new system operated by the European Commission.

For the first time, the approval system will be centralized, with applications submitted to the European Commission rather than individual member states as has been the approach before now.

This new EU piece of legislation – together with its implementing Regulations 2017/2468 & 2017/2469 – defines the standards & authorization procedures for the commercialization of novel products, such as insects and their derived products, on the European market.

IPIFF officials have particularly welcomed the clarity the new rules will bring.

“We are particularly pleased with the introduction of simplified and harmonized rules to regulate what constituted so far a ‘gray area’ from a legal perspective,” said IPIFF President Antoine Hubert. 

“Indeed, the new legislation clarifies the fact that insects and their derived products as food are subject to the ‘novel foods’ approval procedures, whilst it establishes a centralized authorization system relying on the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) as sole assessment body.”

“These improvements, compared to the previous system, should lay the foundations for a level playing field between European insect producers added the IPIFF Chair.”

Chair of the IPIFF Novel Food Task Force, Heidi de Bruin explained how insect producers now have all legislative pieces to prepare & complete their novel food application.

“Several applications, notably originating from IPIFF members companies, are now ready for submission,” she said.

“We are confident that robust and well-documented applications will be processed rapidly enough, as permitted by the introduction of deadlines in the new novel food authorization procedure.”

The IPIFF novel food Task Force supports insect producers in the preparation of such application dossiers.

“We are currently compiling available scientific data that are relevant to the safety of insects for human consumption. Furthermore, we are preparing a guidance document which will serve as a toolkit for insect producing companies to implement the new EU novel food requirements,” added de Bruin.

“These works are complementary to the IPIFF guidance document on best hygienic practices which IPIFF is currently developing: ‘compliance with EU food safety standards & adherence with risk management procedures along all production operations are indeed a prerequisite to the safety of insect products in food applications’.”

Read more from a FoodIngredientsFirst Special Report “Centralized EU Novel Foods Regulation kicks in, but will it inspire more applications?” here.

A key interview with Heidi de Bruin will be available to read on FoodIngredientsFirst next week.

To contact our editorial team please email us at editorial@cnsmedia.com

Related Articles

Business News

Healthier snacking: PepsiCo Mexico achieves 24 percent sugar and salt reduction

17 Aug 2018 --- PepsiCo Mexico has cut down on sugar and salt across its snacks portfolio by 24 percent as part of a long-term reformulation strategy designed to reduce added sugars and sodium across products.

Business News

Monsanto glyphosate traces show up in US breakfast cereals and snack bars

17 Aug 2018 --- Laboratory tests commissioned by US activists Environmental Working Group (EWG), have revealed that glyphosate – the active herbicide in Monsanto’s Roundup weedkiller used in commercialized agriculture all over the world – has been found in a raft of oat-based breakfast cereals and snack bars.

Business News

Rethinking seafood: “Cellular aquaculture” pioneers BlueNalu raise US$4.5m

17 Aug 2018 --- As cultured meat continues to attract attention from global investors, manufacturers and start-ups, a US firm is pioneering a technique of producing real seafood products directly from fish cells. The technology is tipped to be a disruptive game-changer to current industry practices. Just two months after the launch of the company, BluNalu, a trailblazer in the field of “cellular aquaculture,” has announced the closing of a US$4.5 million seed round.

Food Research

A rich scientific harvest: The wheat genome is finally cracked

17 Aug 2018 --- The International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium (IWGSC) has published a detailed description of the genome of bread wheat, the world’s most widely cultivated crop in the international journal Science. This work will pave the way for the production of wheat varieties better adapted to climate challenges, with higher yields, enhanced nutritional quality and improved sustainability.

Food Ingredients News

Weekly Roundup: BASF closes Bayer seeds buy, ADM strengthens oilseeds processing position

17 Aug 2018 --- In a busy week on the commodity front, BASF closed the acquisition of Bayer’s global vegetable seeds business, ADM reached an agreement to purchase certain assets of Brazil-based Algar Agro and IMCD reported positive results for the first half of 2018. Louis Dreyfus Company (LDC) published its sixth annual Sustainability Report, outlining progress towards its ambitious targets for a sustainable future.

More Articles