Tate & Lyle to Unveil Health & Wellness Ingredients With a Major Taste Advantage

13 Nov 2012 --- ‘We have long experience in partnering with manufacturers– and in every solution we create, taste is always king,’ says Anne Barry, Marketing & Communications Manager EMEA, Tate & Lyle.

13 Nov 2012 --- European food and beverage manufacturers attending Health ingredients Europe (HiE) tradeshow are about to discover two exciting new ingredients. Both deliver that rare combination of properties: significant sugar or salt reduction with a superior taste and natural origin.

TASTEVA Stevia Sweetener and SODA-LO Salt Microspheres are the latest additions to the Tate & Lyle health and wellness portfolio.

• TASTEVA Stevia Sweetener: This great-tasting stevia sweetener provides zero-calorie sweetness. With TASTEVA, food and beverage manufacturers seeking sweetness from a natural source can reduce sugar levels by 50 percent or more in most applications, without the bitter/liquorice aftertaste often associated with other high purity, stevia-based sweeteners.

Key innovation: TASTEVA Stevia Sweetener was created with a patent-pending steviol glycoside composition, designed to give formulators the ability to deliver a clean, sweet taste at high sugar-replacement levels and fewer calories.

• SODA-LO Salt Microspheres: This salt-reduction innovation reduces salt levels by up to 25%-50% in bakery and snack applications. SODA-LO is made from salt, labelled as salt and maintains a salt taste without the bitterness or off-flavours often associated with other salt compounds and substitutes.

Key innovation: SODA-LO utilises a patent pending technology that turns standard salt crystals into free-flowing, hollow crystalline microspheres.

‘We have long experience in partnering with manufacturers– and in every solution we create, taste is always king,’ says Anne Barry, Marketing & Communications Manager EMEA, Tate & Lyle. ‘We understand that natural positioning is important to consumers, but when it comes to purchasing decisions, they will not compromise on taste. With these two new ingredients in our toolbox, manufacturers and consumers really can have it all."

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