Calls to Halt GM Maize Authorizations

778afe6c-d2f2-4b44-bbbb-bb72ac530eb6articleimage.jpg

05 May 2017 --- MEPs oppose EU Commission plans to authorise imports of products derived from or containing herbicide resistant genetically modified (GM) maize and cotton, in two resolutions voted on Thursday. They highlight the concerns raised by independent research and member states, and reiterate Parliament’s call for a reform of the EU’s GMO authorisation procedure.

The resolution opposing the placing on the market of products containing maize DAS-40278-9 highlights the concerns raised by independent research about the risks of the 2,4D herbicide, to which the maize is resistant, regarding embryo development, birth defects and endocrine disruption. 

MEPs stress that many critical comments were issued by Member States during the three-months consultation period before approval, referring inter alia to missing or insufficient data, contradictory statements and poor test design.

The resolution was adopted with 35 votes to 19.

In a separate resolution, adopted with 38 votes to 15, MEPs say that imports of products from genetically modified cotton GHB119 should not be authorised as this would encourage the use of glufosinate ammonium-based herbicides (to which GHB119 is resistant) in the world, while glufosinate is classified as toxic for reproduction.

Critical comments were also submitted by Member States, MEPs say, highlighting shortcomings in the environmental risk assessment and missing data.

Next steps
Both texts, tabled by MEPs Bart Staes (Greens/EFA, BE) Lynn Boylan (GUE/NGL, IE), Guillaume Balas (S&D, FR), Eleonora Evi (EFDD, IT), Valentinas Mazuronis (ALDE, LT) and Sirpa Pietikäinen (EPP, FI) will be put to a vote by the full House during the 15-18 May plenary session in Strasbourg.

To contact our editorial team please email us at editorial@cnsmedia.com

Related Articles

Food Ingredients News

Sustainable operations: Consumer and investor demand spurs food & beverage response, finds Ceres report

24 Apr 2018 --- Consumer demand for clean food, transparent labeling and responsible sourcing is challenging the industry’s business models, forcing large companies to rapidly transform their portfolios by accelerating research and development timelines, vying to acquire artisanal or organic brands, and reformulating existing product lines. These were among the key learnings from a food and beverage sector analysis is derived from Turning Point: Corporate Progress on the Ceres Roadmap for Sustainability.

Food Ingredients News

Damning cocoa report: Decade-long efforts to improve cocoa sector falling way short, claims NGO

20 Apr 2018 --- A damning report into the cocoa sector claims that widely touted efforts in the industry to improve the lives of farmers, communities and the environment made over the last decade are having little impact. Despite many of the big players in the cocoa and chocolate supply chain working on sustainability issues like trying to eradicate child labor and stopping environmental damage like deforestation, the efforts of companies and governments have very little influence, according to the Cocoa Barometer 2018.

Food Ingredients News

Making agricultural sustainability mainstream: Olam launches AtSource

18 Apr 2018 --- Global agri-business, Olam International, has launched AtSource – a sustainable and traceable sourcing solution that provides unrivaled environmental and social insights into the journey of agricultural raw materials and food ingredients from the farm to manufacturing and retail customers. AtSource will also enhance Olam’s ability to assess and positively influence the environmental footprint of the 4.7 million farmers in the company’s supply chain, the vast majority of whom are smallholders growing crops such as cocoa, coffee and cashew in emerging markets.

Food Ingredients News

New EU acrylamide legislation comes into force

11 Apr 2018 --- New European Union legislation comes into force today (April 11) concerning the amount of acrylamide in foods with “benchmark” levels being set for various products. Passed by the EU last year, today marks the beginning of the law which limits the amount of acrylamide allowed in packaged foods and forces manufacturers to closely examine and reduce acrylamide levels in products.

Food Ingredients News

UK: Iceland retailer scraps palm oil from own label food

10 Apr 2018 --- UK supermarket Iceland is making a pioneering move by claiming to be the first major supermarket in Britain to completely remove palm oil from its own label food. The UK’s leading frozen food specialist has said that it will stop using palm oil as an ingredient in all its own label food by the end of this year. The project is already well underway, with palm oil successfully removed from 50 percent of its own label range; 130 products will have been reformulated by the end of 2018.

More Articles