Mazza Innovation Opens Processing Facility for its PhytoClean Extracts

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07 Mar 2016 --- Mazza Innovation Ltd. have announced the opening of its first large-scale commercial extraction processing facility in order to produce its PhytoClean Cranberry, Green Tea and Blueberry extracts as well as other clean label ingredients for its customers.

Mazza’s process is a significant advance in environmental standards for extraction technologies. 

The 38,000 sq.ft. facility has received its GMP certification and is fully compliant with the quality requirements of dietary supplements and natural health product manufacturers, including with organic customers in the near future. Since the Mazza PhytoClean process only uses water as its solvent, no costly solvent-handling environmental safety permits or explosion-proof equipment were needed in its construction. This translates into competitive pricing for its quality ingredients or contract manufacturing services offered to its customers.

“Opening and initiating large-scale production is an exciting and important milestone for Mazza as we enter commercial production of our advanced premium extracts for the customers who have placed orders,” said Benjamin Lightburn, president of Mazza Innovation, “We now have significant processing capability to fulfill demand. Our extraction technology can be applied to source many different botanical ingredients with higher purity than is typically available.”

All three award-winning ingredients are produced using the PhytoClean Method that produces solvent-free, excipient-free and GMO-free standardized extracts that meet the industry’s highest quality standards.

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