BRC publishes new guidance on food packaging

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22 Aug 2017 --- Brand and consumer protection organization, BRC Global Standards has published the first edition of food packaging materials guidance. It’s geared towards achieving a common understanding, terminology and point of reference for good practice for businesses involved in the delivery of food and to prevent substances from packaging materials from getting into food.

Developed with the Food and Drink Federation (FDF) and Campden BRI, it details good practice with regard to the potential migration of substances from packaging materials into food.

Speaking to FoodIngredientsFirst, a spokesperson for Campden BRI said: “The BRC Global guidance on migration from packaging into food has been produced to help companies understand their requirements regarding migration testing as described in both EU and FDA regulations. This will help companies to ensure they carry out the correct testing thereby reducing the potential for non-compliant packaging to be placed on the market.”
 
“Campden BRI is members of the BRC Packaging Technical Committee and FDF Food Contact Materials committee and support the work of BRC and other standards organizations regarding packaging and packaging testing. Our role was to provide technical legislative input into the guidance based on our practical experience.”

The comprehensive guidance outlines what migration is, how it occurs and how it can be minimized through new products or existing product development. 

It proffers a best-practice approach to reducing the risk of migration of substances into food products of all types. The guidance also includes an outline of the European Union (EU) and US Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) legislative requirements relating to migration.

It will be of value to organizations in the supply chain including retailers, brand owners, agents or brokers, food processors, packaging manufacturers, and companies providing storage and distribution services.

“The launch of the publication is itself a great example of partners from across the supply chain working constructively with one another. By identifying best practice in each industry together, we can ensure the production of safe, high-quality packaged food,” says Joanna Griffiths, Packaging Technical Manager at BRC Global Standards.

“FDF is pleased to have worked with BRC Global Standards and Campden BRI to produce this valuable resource which will assist companies in managing compliance with food contact materials legislation. The guidance explains the factors affecting migration and sets out a practical approach to designing in compliance through the supply chain,” says Kerina Cheesman, Head of Food Integrity and Policy at the Food and Drink Federation.

The guidance will be made available to Campden BRI, and FDF members, and is available for purchase from the BRC Bookshop.

By Gaynor Selby

This feature is provided by FoodIngredientsFirst's sister website, PackagingInsights.

To contact our editorial team please email us at editorial@cnsmedia.com

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