Bumble Bee Study Does Not Affect Neonicotinoid Conclusions, EFSA Says

5 June 2013 --- EFSA has identified several weaknesses in a study, published by the UK Food and Environment Research Agency (FERA), which suggested that neonicotinoid pesticides do not have a major effect on bumble bee colonies under field conditions.

Given these weaknesses, the Authority considers that the study does not affect the conclusions reached by EFSA regarding risks for bees related to the use of the neonicotinoid pesticides thiamethoxam, clothianidin and imidacloprid, published in January 2013.

The Authority made the following points regarding the relevance of the study, Effects of neonicotinoid seed treatments on bumble bee colonies under field conditions (Thompson et al.), to the risk assessments published by EFSA:
•EFSA’s assessments covered the authorised uses of a number of plant protection products containing thiamethoxam, clothianidin and imidacloprid across the European Union. The FERA study looked at only one crop – oilseed rape – and two plant protection products – one containing clothianidin, the other imidacloprid – authorised for use in the UK. Furthermore, the test sites and surrounding areas used in the FERA study reflect a small sample of agricultural conditions in the UK and cannot be considered representative of conditions in other parts of the EU.
•Two important routes of exposure – dust and guttation – were not addressed by the FERA study.
•In its assessments, EFSA reached conclusions mainly for honey bees, and identified a data gap for other pollinators. Field studies of bumble bees cannot be used to understand the risks to honey bees and other pollinators because of significant species differences.

EFSA’s experts highlighted a number of other deficiencies in the report. These include:
•Inconsistencies and contradictory statements regarding the objectives of the study.
•Absence of suitable control bee colonies. In particular, analysis of residues in pollen and nectar showed that the “control” site had been contaminated by thiamethoxam.
•Environmental conditions were varied across the three the test sites, which reduces the sensitivity of the study in detecting effects on colonies.

EFSA also raised concerns about how Thompson et al. elaborated and interpreted the study results to reach their conclusions.

Related Articles

From TWOFI

Firmenich’s Strategy: Beyond Taste Alone

01 Dec 2016 ---  As customers look to differentiate themselves from their competitors and also try to attract a very dynamic consumer base, they are increasingly benefiting from partners such as Firmenich, to offer value added services.

From TWOFI

Opinion Edge: The Supplier View: 2017 Food Trends

01 Dec 2016 ---  Key suppliers offer their thoughts on key food industry trends to watch. What will be the key consumer trends driving the food industry forward in 2017 and how are they impacting supplier R&D development?

From TWOFI

View From The Top: Paul Collins, GNT Group

01 Dec 2016 ---  A recent pan-European consumer survey by the GNT Group, the leading global provider of coloring foods, found that 47% of the Europeans try to avoid snack products containing additive colors as much as possible. Earlier this year, the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) published a new legislation GSO 2500/2015 relating to the use of food additives.

From TWOFI

Ingredient Technology: New Vegan Alternatives

01 Dec 2016 ---  Innovative ingredients based on potatoes can be used to formulate allergen-free and GMO-free products, so these new consumer groups do not have to give up on their favorite snack items.

From TWOFI

Collagen Peptides For Body Shaping

01 Dec 2016 ---  The combination of resistance exercise and specific collagen peptides supplementation is well suited to increase strength, influence body composition and fight the onset of sarcopenia.

More Articles