Unilever to Reduce the Size of Top Ice Creams to Reduce Calories

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25 Jan 2016 --- Unilever is to cut back the size of ice cream favorites Cornetto, Ben & Jerry’s and Feast by up to a third bringing all its single-serving ice-creams to under 250 calories.

The move is the latest effort by Unilever to cut the calories of its products and respond to the government’s anti-obesity drive.

The food giant has spent 18 months researching its latest move to bring all its single-serving ice-creams to below 250 calories, which comes under its “sustainable living plan”.

Unilever argues its “sustainable living plan” is helping the health and well-being of consumers.

The change will take place from the spring and will mean that Ben & Jerry’s single portion tubs will be cut from 150ml to 100ml, which equates to a 33% decrease in size.

However, the move could prompt consumer backlash, as the price of Ben & Jerry’s single portion tubs will only be reduced by just 26% from £2.04 to £1.50.

Further changes will see a Magnum Almond drop in size from 110ml to 100ml, a Feast Chocolate will drop 2ml to 90ml while the Magnum Classic will be reduced from 120ml to 110ml.

Unilever is also ditching a clutch of its ice-creams, worth more than £5m in annual UK retail sales, including Magnum Infinity Chocolate and Cornetto Choc ‘N’ Ball completely from its range.

Noel Clarke, Unilever UK & Ireland’s executive director of brand building, said: “We have introduced this 250 calorie cap to help make it easier for our consumers to make informed and healthier choices when enjoying their favourite ice-creams as part of a balanced lifestyle.

“It is important there be no compromise to taste or quality and that’s exactly what we’ve delivered.”

Unilever-along with other food companies- has been making inroads in culling calories from its products as it looks to align itself with the consumer trend towards healthier eating.

In 2012, it cut calories in a number of its children’s ice-creams, such as Calippo and Twister.

Confectionery giants Mars and Cadbury have both made pledges not to make chocolate bars that contain no more than 250 calories.

However, there has been criticism from the likes of Mumsnet that the reduction in the size of products had not been reflected in price reduction.

Research by MySupermarket.com found that the sizes of a number of Christmas favourites, such as Cadbury’s Roses, Terry’s Chocolate Orange had shrunk while the prices had gone up.

By John Reynolds

To contact our editorial team please email us at editorial@cnsmedia.com

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