Study reveals consumers increasingly skipping breakfast


23 Nov 2017 --- Consumers are skipping breakfast slightly more often now than in 2015, and it comes largely at the expense of at-home breakfast occasions, according to Technomic’s recently released 2017 Breakfast Consumer Trend Report.

Consumers’ breakfast attitudes are changing as they respond to the busy pace of modern life and evolving definitions of healthy eating. For example, fewer consumers now than two years ago say that skipping breakfast is unhealthy, meaning that snacks or beverages could increasingly be considered suitable replacements for a full morning meal. Operators who evolve and cater to time-crunched consumers will put themselves in the best position to steal share moving forward.

“Speedy service and craveable grab-and-go options can help operators and suppliers engrain themselves into consumers’ morning routines,” explains Kelly Weikel, director of consumer insights at Technomic. “Time also remains a key deterrent to breakfast occasions, so operators will need to push the envelope in terms of convenience. Order-ahead and delivery capabilities are likely to appeal to those who constantly feel short on time in the mornings.”

Key takeaways from the report include:

  • All-day breakfast menus remain popular, with 30 percent of consumers saying that they are purchasing breakfast fare beyond morning hours more often now than two years ago
  • There is an opportunity to grow brunch occasions, as 40 percent of consumers eat brunch at least once a week. Additionally, 31 percent of consumers say they consider breakfast to be more of a destination than they did two years ago
  • Coffee brand loyalty is down. Currently, 37 percent of coffee drinkers say they are loyal to a coffee brand or the restaurant that serves their preferred coffee, compared to 41 percent in 2015.

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