General Mills Moves Closer to Removal of Artificial Ingredients From its Cereals

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21 Jan 2016 --- As part of a commitment to remove artificial flavors and colors from artificial sources from all of its cereals by the end of 2017, General Mills is releasing its first wave of new cereal recipes in the US, which includes Trix, Reese's Puffs, Cocoa Puffs, Golden Grahams, Chocolate Cheerios, Frosted Cheerios and Fruity Cheerios. 

These seven cereal varieties highlight no high fructose corn syrup and no artificial flavors and colors from artificial sources on the front of each box. They arrive on store shelves as the new US 2015 Dietary Guidelines outline a growing need for consumers to add more whole grains in their diet, an area General Mills Big G cereals has been working on since 2005. This has resulted in whole grains as the first ingredient in all of its cereals.

"We are thrilled to see the 2015 Dietary Guidelines continue to recommend making half of your grains whole and recognizing 16 grams of whole grain as a serving, which wasn't in the previous Guidelines," said Lesley Shiery, RD, senior nutrition scientist, Bell Institute of Health and Nutrition at General Mills. "All of our Big G cereals contain at least 10 grams of whole grain per serving and many also deliver underconsumed nutrients for specific populations like vitamins A, C, D, calcium and iron."

The updated General Mills' cereal recipes now include fruit and vegetables juices, as well as spice extracts such as turmeric and annatto to achieve the fun red, yellow, orange and purple colors in Trix and Fruity Cheerios. Reese' Puffs and Golden Grahams will incorporate natural vanilla flavor to achieve the same great taste that adults and children have come to expect.

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