French Ecology Minister Attacks Nutella Over Palm Oil Use

635703050363374888Nutella.jpg

19 Jun 2015 --- France’s Minister of Ecology, Sustainable Development and Energy, Ségolène Royal, has ruffled many feathers in the sustainable palm oil industry this week, by saying that consumers should stop eating chocolate spread brand Nutella, made by Ferrero. The minister, who made the comments on a television show, singled out the product, saying that it is made using palm oil, which contributes to deforestation. 

“We have to replant a lot of trees because there is massive deforestation that also leads to global warming. We should stop eating Nutella, for example, because it’s made with palm oil,” she said.

Nutella responded by making a statement on its website saying that all of the palm oil it uses in 100% sustainable.

The Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO), the leading global organisation promoting the sustainable production of palm oil, is deeply concerned that comments by Royal could harm rather than help efforts to curb global deforestation.
 
 The answer to global deforestation challenges is to source Certified Sustainable Palm Oil (CSPO), instead of conventional palm oil, the RSPO said.
  
Compared to other oil crops such as soy bean, sunflower or rapeseed, oil palms produce significantly more vegetable oil per hectare of land (4-10 times more). Switching to other vegetable oils may very well result in more forests being converted into agricultural land, not less.
  
Global demand for vegetable oils continues to increase, growing by over 5 percent a year for more than a decade, and is expected to continue to grow at that rate for the next decade. This growth rate substantially exceeds the United Nations estimate for global population growth of 1.1 percent through 2020.
  
Oil palm contributes significantly to the global supply of edible oils. In 2013, palm oil and palm kernel oil accounted for 40% of the 169 million tonnes of global vegetable and fruit oils produced. In order to meet this global demand, CSPO must be part of any solution. Using less efficient crops might have severe consequences for the environment.
  
Halting the use of palm oil in Europe will not solve the worst problems. Many other countries such as China and India will continue using palm oil, with consumption predicted to increase as the middle classes in these countries grow. Developing countries will continue to increase production for growing Indian and Chinese markets, and with diminished pressure for sustainable practice.
  
Without pressure for sustainable palm oil from developed nations, the likely outcome is more unsustainable palm oil. For this reason, the RSPO calls on all European industries and stakeholders to move towards 100% CSPO by 2020. 
 
Given its scale and ability to influence global markets, a 100% CSPO Europe would encourage more growers to move to more sustainable production practices, while helping make CSPO more attractive and available to other large markets.
  
RSPO recognises that palm oil’s cultivation is one of the major causes of deforestation in South-East Asia. RSPO was created in 2004 to address this issue and currently 20% of the world’s palm oil production is RSPO certified. RSPO also acknowledges that more needs to be done to improve the credibility of its certification. To this end, the RSPO Board of Governors has recently announced its intention to adopt a set of additional voluntary criteria, aimed at further enhancing the existing certification requirements on peat, deforestation and indigenous people’s rights.
  
Among our members, said RSPO, Ferrero is one of the leading food manufacturers promoting the use of CSPO. As of 1st January 2015, Ferrero products contain only 100% segregated CSPO. For a large food manufacturer this is a considerable achievement. We encourage other companies to mirror Ferrero’s commitment to sustainable palm oil sourcing.

To contact our editorial team please email us at editorial@cnsmedia.com

Related Articles

Food Ingredients News

Nestlé strengthens coffee investment with Nescafé Dolce Gusto production in Vietnam

19 Jul 2018 --- Nestlé has inaugurated a new Nescafé Dolce Gusto capsule production line in Dong Nai Province, Vietnam which will ramp up processing to 2,500 tons of coffee per year (equivalent to 130 million capsules), using high-quality coffee beans from Vietnam. And over the next few years, the volume is expected to grow further.

Food Ingredients News

Sustainable palm oil body reinstates Nestlé’s membership

17 Jul 2018 --- Three weeks after Nestlé was suspended from the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) for breaching its code of conduct, the food giant has been reinstated after submitting its action plan to achieve 100 percent RSPO-certified sustainable palm oil by 2023. The reinstatement of Nestlé's certificates and membership status came yesterday (July 16) in a joint announcement from the Swiss food giant and the palm oil industry watchdog.

Food Ingredients News

Sustainable soy: Louis Dreyfus promises to raise the bar

10 Jul 2018 --- Louis Dreyfus, the global merchant firm involved in agriculture and food processing, notes that the soy industry is now growing so rapidly that managing its supply chain sustainably is becoming “increasingly urgent.” That’s why it has just launched a new policy geared towards protecting biodiversity, preserving natural resources and habitats while also generating a fair wage for farmers.

Food Ingredients News

Nestlé responds to RSPO suspension: “approach is not conducive to achieving urgent transformation levels”

29 Jun 2018 --- Swiss food giant Nestlé has responded to being suspended from the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil for breaching its code of conduct by claiming the organization’s approach “is not conducive to achieving the levels of industry transparency and transformation the sector so urgently needs.”

Food Ingredients News

Palm oil report: Alternatives would be environmentally even worse

27 Jun 2018 --- A new report examining palm oil says its production is a disaster for tropical rainforests and trashing the habitats of orangutans and tigers – but alternatives like soy, corn and rapeseed could be even worse because these crops are much more land-hungry. The report “Oil palm and biodiversity” is an in-depth analysis by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Oil Palm Task Force which delves into the many challenges of palm oil production in countries like Malaysia and Indonesia.

More Articles