Genomic Research to Identify Salmonella Strains That Cause Human Disease

635743606874943070girl lab.jpg

05 Aug 2015 --- Poultry used to be the usual suspect in cases of Salmonella poisoning. Today, however, most outbreaks of the illness come from fruit and vegetables that have become infected when the soil in which they grow is polluted by animal waste or non-potable water. There currently is no method of reducing the growth of Salmonella on such produce.

Researchers from McGill and Laval universities will receive close to $10 million over the next four years for work that is designed to both identify and find natural solutions for the reducing the growth of the salmonella strains that cause human disease. 
 
This is one of two Quebec-based research projects that will receive funding from Genome Canada and Génome Québec under the program Genomics and Feeding the Future.”
 
“McGill’s researchers are committed to reducing foodborne disease outbreaks, which are a significant global public health threat. Genome Canada and Genome Quebec’s major investment in genomic research will lead to innovative preventive interventions for Salmonella-induced disease, and further study methods to eradicate it”, said Rosie Goldstein, Vice-Principal (Research and International Relations). 
 
Each year, Salmonella infects some 88,000 people in Canada who consume contaminated food. And while many people suffer no ill effects, or a mild case of abdominal cramps, fever or diarrhea, others experience more serious infections, which can result in dehydration or infection travelling beyond the intestines, requiring medical attention and resulting in disability or even death. Salmonella infection is thought to cost the Canadian economy as much as $1 billion each year in medical costs, absences from work and economic losses to food companies and restaurants.  
 
Dr. Lawrence Goodridge of McGill University and Roger C. Levesque from the Institute for Integrative Systems Biology (IBIS), Université Laval, are leading a team that is using whole genome sequencing to identify the specific Salmonella strains that cause human disease. With this knowledge, the team will develop natural biosolutions to control the presence of Salmonella in fruit and vegetables as they are growing in the field. The team will also develop new tests to rapidly and efficiently detect the presence of Salmonella on fresh produce before it is sold to consumers, as well as tools to allow public health officials to determine the source of Salmonella outbreaks when they occur, so that contaminated food can be quickly removed from grocery stores and restaurants. Their work will reduce the number of people infected with Salmonella each year, as well as the economic costs of the infection.

Related Articles

Business News

Roha strengthens presence in Canada with acquisition of Cambrian Solutions Color Business

23 Oct 2017 --- Continuing to expand on its vision of staying true to local values, Roha is strengthening its presence in Canada by acquiring Cambrian Solutions Inc’s color business. This is the fourth acquisition for Roha this year. In January, Roha announced the acquisition of Italy based Essential SRL, a leading manufacturer of plant- and fruit-based natural coloring and flavoring ingredients. Later in the year, announced the acquisition of the color division from Delta Aromatics of Egypt and most recently, the company announced the acquisition of New Foods Industry S.p.A. near Verona in Italy, an expert in dry ingredients.&

Food Ingredients News

CSIRO partners on apples that won't go brown

23 Oct 2017 --- Earlier this month, a special kind of sliced apple went on sale at select US supermarkets, and thanks to CSIRO research these apples won’t turn brown when they’re cut, bitten or bruised. Arctic apples have been developed by Canadian biotech company, Okanagan Specialty Fruits Inc. (OSF). OSF is the first company to license CSIRO’s non-browning technology.

Food Ingredients News

Sugar coating sugar reduction: Finding the balance in the dairy space

23 Oct 2017 --- One of the most striking international phenomena in recent years is how consumer attitudes have changed towards sugar. In the food and drink industry, reducing sugar content, using alternative sweeteners and being more health conscious are top priorities in today’s consumer trends. Late last year, Innova Market Insights tipped “Sweeter Balance” as the top three trends for 2017 and even later in the year, sugar reduction is still on the tip of the tongue.

Business News

UK signs up to Dairy Declaration of Rotterdam

20 Oct 2017 --- The UK dairy industry has endorsed a declaration to promote the sustainability of dairy systems around the world. The Dairy Declaration of Rotterdam, a unique partnership between the International Dairy Federation (IDF) and the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO) signals a recognition of the dairy sector’s commitment towards feeding the world with safe, nutritious and sustainable products.

Business News

Firmenich commits to 100 percent sustainable juice

20 Oct 2017 --- Firmenich has signed the Sustainable Juice Covenant, joining forces with leading European beverage and food companies to commit to creating 100 percent sustainable juice and puree by 2030. Under the coordination of IDH: the Sustainable Trade Initiative, Firmenich, Döhler, FrieslandCampina Riedel, Refresco and Verbruggen Juice Trading Sustainable Products b.v., have agreed to target 100 percent verified sustainable sourcing for their juices within the next decade.

More Articles