Emerging Plant Protein Solutions Challenge Soy’s Dominance

3 Sep 2013 --- The vegetable protein category encompasses much more than soy and innovative new protein sources available can be considered a welcome addition to the vegetable protein portfolio. In his new book Rice Protein & Beyond, Henk Hoogenkamp world renowned protein expert, and author explores the areas of emerging plant protein solutions which will shape the future of formulated foods.

Henk takes us into a new dimension of combined food protein strategies that he believes will drive health, affordability and sustainability issues in the years to come.
 
Hoogenkamp notes that alternative choices to soy protein, such as mustard flour, pea protein, microalgae, and rice protein, may have preferential benefits like superior flavor, hypoallergenicity, and preferred consumer labeling. It is logical that much of these ingredients’ positioning is aimed at soy and soy protein ingredients, considering that soy is the world’s largest and most dominant source of vegetable protein.
 
According to Hoogenkamp, pea protein is probably farthest ahead on the curve, offering excellent water-lipid linkage properties.
 
Quinoa is another promising highly nutritious yet “old-age” cereal-like crop that is rich in protein and micronutrients. The almost forgotten protein-rich grain is now quickly recovering and frequently used in organic foods, including high moisture extruded meatfree options. Quinoa is now also cultivated and harvested in the US, Canada, UK, Scandinavia, and India.
 
Canola or rapeseed protein and oat protein are also viable vegetable proteins, just like potato protein and sorghum. Commercialization of canola, oat, and potato protein isolate will delight food formulators with additional processing options. Expect these vegetable proteins to be positioned at the semi-high end of the application spectrum somewhere between soy proteins isolate and dairy protein prices.
 
Rice has been the staple of billions of people for a great many centuries. This grain is much more than a vehicle to deliver carbohydrate calories. Being one of the oldest grains, rice has not been explored to the same extend as wheat, corn and soy. The reason is probably due to the available funding of US driven agricultural interests. However, since the beginning of the 21st Century, science and food technology are quickly unraveling this grain’s potential and formulators have started to incorporate rice bran and its many fractions to provide functionality, health and taste contributions, as well as cost efficiency.
 
About 90% of all the nutrients of rice are embedded in the rice bran and germ. Being an inherent part of the whole grain, it also contains phytonutrients like tocopherols, tocotrienols, oryzanols and phytosterols. Stabilization technology has made it possible to recoup a range of highly-nutritive ingredients from rice bran including protein, fibers, and oil.
 
In his book, Hoogenkamp examines the influence of the selection criteria and the profound effects on (sub)related variables such as ecology, sustainability, protein quality, societal diagnostics. Besides an ongoing food evolution there is a revolution which is emerging to serve the rapidly expanding world population together with its spin-off developments such as protein supplementation, meatfree, glutenfree, hypoallergenicity, diabetes mellitus, sarcopenia and calorie intake management.

www.henkhoogenkamp.com

Related Articles

Food Ingredients News

Cargill makes first investment in Saudi Arabia, targets Middle Eastern growth

23 Jan 2018 --- Through a joint venture between Cargill and Arasco, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) has a new corn milling facility to meet the growing demand of the region’s food and beverage industry. The Middle East Food Solutions Company (MEFSCO Corn Milling Facility), inaugurated in Al-Kharj, is Cargill’s first investment in KSA. The investment marks the company’s commitment to the Middle Eastern economy and support for the region’s food and beverage manufacturers.

Food Ingredients News

Cargill diversifies starches and sweeteners site in Krefeld, Germany

19 Jan 2018 --- Cargill is expanding and diversifying its product portfolio at its starches and sweeteners plant in Krefeld, Germany with products such as vegetable wheat protein, specialized industrial wheat starches and advanced biofuel. Transitioning this site from a corn to wheat processing facility allows Cargill to add these products to its product portfolio and help customers address changing consumer needs in terms of nutrition, packaging and sustainable fuel.

Business News

Pea protein surge: Cargill invests in Puris, the largest North American producer

18 Jan 2018 --- With the rapid rise in consumer demand for plant-based protein, PURIS, the largest North American producer of pea protein, and Cargill have signed a joint venture agreement to accelerate a new wave of “great tasting, sustainable and label-friendly plant-based foods.” The joint venture is closed as of Tuesday (January 16, 2018). Cargill is a minority investor in PURIS’s pea protein business, with Cargill financially backing PURIS for growth into the future.

Food Ingredients News

Cayuga Milk Ingredients achieves Non-GMO Project Verification

18 Jan 2018 --- Cayuga Milk Ingredients has announced that its entire portfolio of dairy ingredients recently achieved the Non-GMO Project Verification. 

Food Ingredients News

Comax study highlights consumer attitudes towards yogurt

17 Jan 2018 --- Comax Flavors has released new primary research on consumers’ behavior, usage and attitudes towards yogurt. This is the fifth study of the company’s primary market research program. The yogurt study was fielded in June 2017 with 500 US respondents aged 18-70+; half of which were parents of children aged 1-17. In addition, the sample featured 250 female and 250 male respondents.

More Articles