Fresh Thinking Vanillas For The Bakery Market From Cornelius

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19 May 2016 --- Cornelius, which launched a new health and nutrition business in the Nordic region in March, is able to offer a range of vanillas to the food industry through a number of suppliers including Nielsen Massey Vanillas, a leading producer of vanilla extracts.

In a market where food manufacturers are being increasingly drawn towards more exotic and unusual flavors, vanilla is often viewed as the "Plain Jane" of ingredients.

Rachel Fordham, dairy, desserts and beverages sales manager at Cornelius Group, an independent European distributor of raw materials and ingredients to the food and drink industry, argues that this thinking couldn’t be further from the truth and food manufacturers in the bakery sector are missing a trick by removing it from the mix or simply overlooking the impact it can have on recipes.

“The story of vanilla, its versatility, varieties and striking flavors, make it appealing and ideal for so many different applications,” said Rachel. “Whilst ice-cream is by far the largest market we supply to, vanilla can be used in so much more than just desserts and is a great partner to many other food flavorings.”

“Vanilla has masking notes so can be added into spicier, more savory bakery products to tone down stronger flavors, yet it can also be used to bring out the flavor of other ingredients. It enhances our ability to taste other flavors by intensifying them without being overpowering. For example, it can boost the inherent flavors found within certain spices, coffee and nuts – all ingredients used within the sweet and savory bakery sector.”

Rachel added: “Bakers and food manufacturers should remember that there is not just one type of vanilla available. Each variety has its own unique flavor so making sure you are using the right one for your application is key to getting the very best out of this distinctive ingredient.”

Beyond the creamy, more traditional Madagascan vanilla, Mexican vanilla has a combination of sweet and woody notes with a deep spicy character. It pairs well with chocolate, citrus fruits, cinnamon, cloves and other warm spices and can be used in baked goods and frozen desserts. The vanilla’s spiciness also enables it to complement the spice of tomato and barbecue sauces and salsas by smoothing out their heat and acidity.

Tahitian vanilla offers a more bespoke flavor making it a favorite with pastry chefs around the world. It features a fruity, floral, cherry flavor, which adds a delicate hint of vanilla to pastry creams, fruit pies and sauces, puddings and custards.

Anything that is slow-baked benefits from Indonesian vanilla which has a sharp, earthy taste, whilst vanillas from Uganda and India offer a slightly different profile and contain a complex array of flavors which can add a new twist to classic bakery applications such as cookies, cakes and chocolate recipes.

Rachel added: “Bakers and food manufacturers are increasingly looking to push the boundaries to meet consumer demand for exciting new taste innovations. As trends in the sector move towards big, bold, exotic and more unusual flavor combinations, such as sweet with savory, more tropical-inspired fruits and spice extracts, vanilla should not be seen as unfashionable or old fashioned. Its ability to intensify and complement so many of these new in-demand flavors, whilst different varieties bring a new dimension to traditional baked goods, should be embraced by the sector.”

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