France Bans Unlimited Soda Refills

dcf2fb34-fd73-4244-bd5e-b02c46ddb551articleimage.jpg

30 Jan 2017 --- All-you-can-drink free soda refills in restaurants and other public eateries around France have been banned as a new law comes into force legislating against unlimited sugary soft drinks being offered as part of a promotion.

The so-called “soda fountains” that can often be found in family-orientated restaurants in many other countries including the UK, have come under much closer scrutiny in France. 

As part of a drive against obesity, particularly in children, the French government introduced new legislation prohibiting the sale of unlimited soft drinks at a fixed price or offering them on an unlimited basis free of charge.

This self-service promotional strategy is often used as a way to draw in families with bottomless buckets of soda offers to accompany meals. 

The World Health Organization (WHO) says sugary drinks should be taxed as a way to drive down obesity and associated health problems. 

Although the number of people in France suffering obesity is below the European average, numbers are rising and the government is clamping down. 

The new legislation is targeting soft drinks that contain added sugar or sweeteners as well as sports drinks. 

The prohibition came into force on January 18, 2017 and also overs school canteens and fast-food establishments. Anyone ignoring the law faces prosecution and heavy fines. 

The latest decree in France follows a tax on sugary soft drinks that has been running since 2012. 

IKEA is believed to have removed its drink foundations from stores across the country, while fast-food casual restaurant Five Guys, has added microchips to cups that automatically switch off the drinks’ tap if customers try to get a refill. 

Related Articles

Business News

UK: Which supermarkets routinely use antibiotics in their meat production?

17 Nov 2017 --- As World Antibiotic Awareness Week draws to a close, campaign group, The Alliance to Save our Antibiotics, is calling for reductions to farm antibiotic use across the EU and for an end to routine preventative medication of groups of animals. Its new report discloses which UK supermarkets routinely use antibiotics in their meat production.

Regulatory News

Two-thirds of global cocoa supply agree on actions to eliminate deforestation

16 Nov 2017 --- At the UN Climate Change Conference (COP23), top cocoa-producing countries Côte d’Ivoire and Ghana announced far-reaching Frameworks for Action with leading chocolate and cocoa companies to end deforestation and restore forest areas.

Business News

Naturex buys Swedish Oat Fiber, as Q3 revenues slightly decline

15 Nov 2017 --- Naturex is firming up its presence in the natural nutrition market with the acquisition of Swedish Oat Fiber, a specialized manufacturer of oat dietary fibers, oils and proteins. A Naturex spokesperson confirmed to FoodIngredientsFirst that the acquisition price is not being disclosed, however, CEO of the French-headquartered group, Olivier Rigaud, says this latest acquisition will strengthen Naturex’s position and forms part of the company’s continuing strategy for organic and external growth.

Food Ingredients News

US: Moms Across America call for total glyphosate ban

14 Nov 2017 --- The campaign group Moms Across America is calling for controversial glyphosate – the active herbicide in Monsanto’s Roundup weedkiller used in commercialized agriculture all over the world – to be banned across the US.

Food Research

CPW study reveals confusion over whole grain

14 Nov 2017 --- New research commissioned by Cereal Partners Worldwide (CPW), the joint venture between Nestlé and General Mills, has revealed that there is significant confusion over how much whole grain consumers should intake every day and where to find whole grain in foods.

More Articles